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Are you desperate to know the history of the Afghan Taliban War and seeking a memorable novel?

I recommend you read Khalid Hosseini's all novels, especially "The Kite Runner" and "A Thousand Splendid Suns" if your genre is Political fiction, War fiction, Domestic fiction, Historical fiction, and classic drama. His two heart-tugging and blockbuster novels, set in his native Afghanistan, offered simple tales of redemption and grace while the ugly realities of war in the country rumbled through the news. He makes you cry. Yes, I bet on this. His debut, 2003's “The Kite Runner”, written in the early mornings before work as a doctor, was followed by 2007's “A Thousand Splendid Suns” and "And the Mountains Echoed". Together they've sold over 38 million copies worldwide. In "A Thousand Splendid Suns", Mariam, an illegitimate teenager from Herat, is forced to marry a shoemaker from Kabul after a family tragedy. "The Kite Runner," tells Amir's story, a young boy from the Wazir Akbar Khan district of Kabul and a Hazara boy Ali. "And the Mountains Echoed" contains personal inter-linked stories of different characters along with the separation of the two siblings, Abdullah and Pari, which is "the heart of the book". Let me tell you what is so special about Hosseini's novels, so once you start reading the story, you will not want to give it a break because his method of fiction make you feel like you are one of the characters of the book. Each of his books hits you hard, pushes your mind outside the limit of human suffering, and opens the door to self and exploration. There is a world where all that we have taken in life are treated as privileges, even the fundamental rights of humans. His stories are incredibly descriptive and maintain the reader's interest throughout the book. He's great with words and produces images that flow like poetry. All his novels have heartbroken and depressing endings. So, what are you waiting for? Go ahead and click on the attached link and reading in soft copy.


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Khaled Hosseini is the best storyteller, he has the power in his wroting to outshine the devastating part of the tale, you enjoy and cry at the same time. Heart wrenching yet so best!

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The message behind the very ending could be interpreted differently by different readers, but personally I feel that it offers a small sense of hope for both the future of its characters, and perhaps for war-torn Afghanistan as well.

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Khalid hosseni is a splendid writer and his descriptions and storytelling are out of this world , iread the kite runner and I was completely blown away by his storytelling and attention to detail .The endings though tragic were necessary to complete his stories and I enjoy your views on his works.

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Indeed "A Thousand Splendid Suns" is a wonderful novel. The way he describes the struggle of Afghan women in the form of two young girls is worth reading. It depicts the remarkable resilience of Afghan Women. Once started the novel one cannot leave it unfinished. I Will definitely read his other books as well.

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Good luck for his other novels indeed all of them are masterpiece and highly relatable with context of Pakistan and Afghanistan.

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Hi! I just posted on his work as well - slightly different views though lol.. I'd also recommend you read Taliban by Ahmed Rashid and Dancing in the Mosque by Homeira Qaderi. Qaderi is a female Afghani author and activist. We've talked about the importance of studying about cultures and issues from the perspective of people who have directly experienced those issues, so I feel like that book would be appropriate in that regard. As an Afghani-American, Hosseini has spent most of his life outside of Afghanistan and writes mostly from an outsider's perspective, which I feel is extremely biased (in favor of the West). There's a number of papers by Afghani critics regarding his work, I'd recommend reading those…

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Zersh Salman
Zersh Salman
Aug 22, 2021
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Very interesting comment! Never thought about this angle before, will definitely look into the sources you recommended!!

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