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Conflict zones don't have access to elite education



The present-day political bias in conflict settlement impacts future generations of children. Without access to high-quality education, a generation of children growing up in war areas would lack the knowledge and abilities required to make meaningful contributions to their nation's economy. Undoubtedly, UNICEF has made efforts for the cause. However, owing to global political interests, the form of support is skewed because of the political viability of the subject at hand—Palestine and the Gaza Strip. Without protecting education itself, a child's right to an education in a war zone cannot be guaranteed.

Children are easy prey for abuse, exploitation, and recruitment by military forces and other organizations while they are not in school. Schools should provide a secure environment where kids may be shielded from dangers and emergencies. Conflict zones across the world consider education as a luxury. Evidence, however, clearly shows that in order to develop a peaceful attitude and knowledgeable citizenry, education should be a primary emphasis in conflict zones. The political nature of the problem, however, suggests that education itself is under threat, as seen by the bombardment in Gaza. The objectives of UNICEF can only be met with the proper efforts in the correct direction, a global public spirit, and global public policy!


These images, all from 2016, show children from nations that have experienced war attending school despite the continued violence surrounding them.


IRAQ:






YEMEN:




SYRIA:





SOUTH SUDAN:


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There is the question of education's instrumentality of a relationship with conflict, and then there's the question of conflict's effects on education. I think this blog provides very strong, and clear insight into the latter. Conflicts not only strip children from their very basic and fundamental right to obtain quality education, but the effects are far more wide-ranging and dangerous. PTSD and underdevelopment are just some general examples. Upon further investigation, we can see how conflict actually perpetuates more because of its existence. When children are at the center of the conflict, there is a tendency for them to actually develop sympathy for one side of the conflict, to the point they actually end up preferring taking up arms for…

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You have shared great insights and pictures. I can’t imagine what these children must be going through and how strong they are to attend schools in such circumstances. It does not only show their strength but also their parents. I remember when the APS attack took place, even though our schools were in different cities the fear we felt was unimaginable. Just the thought of us being the next target or making plans on how to save our younger siblings if an attack took place on our school gave us many sleepless nights. However, these pictures show the strength education gives to people and tells us how important one’s fight for education truly is especially in conflict zones.

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Same was with me, every night before going to bed I always used to think about all these things. In addition to your comment I have some more ideas, terrorism and war are the acts of violence that emerge with the perpetrated act of humans. Several natural and artificial disasters have devastating psychological impacts on eyewitnesses, who may be children. Think of a child who has witnessed the loss of his family members in a war or a natural disaster, and his flash-back memories of such an event could be very traumatic for that child and need urgent medical attention. In the streamlining of terrorism in Pakistan, terrorist attack in Army public school left behind more than a hundred children…

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Education indeed plays a significant role at every step of conflicts, Pre, during and post conflicts. Education can provide safe environments for these children, physically and psychologically where they can learn and grow. But obviously when infrastructure and everything is destroyed, sending them at schools can sometimes be not an option. Most of these conflicts also happen in muslim countries, where parents become even more scared to send children to schools, especially girls. This comes because of fear of abductions and threats to life.


While the pictures show children going to school even during conflicts, stats show that the number is very less due to the above mentioned reason.


However, to cater to this, one possible solution could be the…

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At this point, when a whole generation of a nation is being denied this fundamental right to education, humanitarian assistance is essential for the regeneration of education in Palestine. And regrettably, the majority of Israel's supporters have turned a blind eye to the pain and misery of Palestinians. While the whole world has been quietly watching the history, present, and, God forbid, the future of Palestine burns, the schools are being closed and destroyed!

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You're right, Umar. All allies have turned their faces from Palestine as they didn't know them. The Israeli occupation of the West Bank and Gaza Strip has lasted 54 years, making the Israeli-Palestinian conflict one of the longest-running confrontations in history. And the impacted people, particularly youngsters, are on their own in this. They are in a miserable and heart-wrenching situation. I think it's time for the Muslim world to unite for them. But the issue is again here that every Muslim country has their somehow links with Israel. Israel is such a powerful country.

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Your blogpost is quite insightful as it depicts different areas of conflict with powerful images of the damages caused to educational institutions in these conflict zones. Post-conflict areas may have some form of primary education but what these areas severely lack is higher studies in terms of universities. This creates a generations of unskilled workers and prevents the economy from having professions such as doctors and engineers which are needed. The sad reality is how children are targeted the most. Do you think the governments of these conflict zones have the ability to provide the youth with universities?

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You raise a good question, Zoya. In conflict zones, it's problematic, or I can say impossible, for the government to build universities. But as far as I think government can improve the quality of education and existing educational institutions. Education programmes should be designed with the long-term goal of building children's academic, social and emotional knowledge and skills to be able to participate fully in their societies and realise their full potential. The facilitators — even those with teaching experience — are provided with intensive training before stepping into the classroom. The performance of facilitators at the non-formal learning centres is also monitored by state officials, the program staff and the community. If the learning facilitators are not deemed fit…

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