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"Don't get too big, Gurl" 🙃

Updated: Nov 30, 2020



I don't know how to articulate what this thread means, and how perfectly it encapsulates my thoughts. I guess that's what happens when people start talking about real, lived experiences. It is true that social media is also responsible for a lot curated and fake content, that fosters unrealistic standards of beauty, eating habits, fitness levels, for both men and women equally. But, I would like to speak to the good side of social media, where people are actively trying to break through the stereotypes.

It is an unbearable pain to have your worst fears celebrated by people, as if that is your achievement, without a thin body, you're not worthy. Of course, even with thin bodies, people are quick to criticise and troll it. Honestly, there is no end to how society can make feel unworthy, excluded. This results in lasting mental health problems, and we need to actively resist against such narratives.

I have to remind myself to not succumb to what people have determined as an ideal.


All bodies deserve freedom of expression, no matter the size or shape.

If it speaks to you, do let me know!


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This thread/post speaks to me on a personal level. As a "chubby" girl, there is no tweet in this world that I could relate the most to. Really agree with your message that all bodies deserve freedom of expression! What a wholesome and thought provoking post!

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Thank you all for sharing your views, recounting personal experiences. And yes body dissatisfaction has become an undeniable fact among many people. We need to learn to look beyond a body weight or colour or size. For instance, there is a page on Instagram called "I weigh", a movement started by Jameela Jamil, an actress and strong advocate of body positivity and women's rights. She along with many members of the community ask the followers to describe or compliment each other with anything beyond physical features. It could be their kindness, strength of character, resilience. So many things to appreciate in people and yet we neglect to do that...

Anyways, I choose to be optimistic of the change that we…

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Neha Ramchand
Neha Ramchand
Nov 30, 2020

Pyaari*

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Neha Ramchand
Neha Ramchand
Nov 30, 2020

I can not explain how much I relate to this! I was an overweight teenager and I tried so hard but I never found anything to like about myself because no one around me thought there was anything to like about me. I would always be told that I was the most beautiful new born baby and then I ate too many parathas. I recently lost weight (through no effort on my part) and all of a sudden the same people are telling me I look so amazing and ‘Pyaar’. Its absolutely not a compliment, I hate to think that my worth lies in how much I weigh. The fact that this thinking is never questioned just makes it worse.

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TW: mention of eating disorders, body dissatisfaction


Hi. I'm doing a Psychology research essay on something similar to this, which discusses how media portrayal and expectations can lead to body dissatisfaction. The facts are undeniable; we as a society or even a whole world are obsessed with people's weight. Be it social media portrayal, peer pressure, or even our infamous desi aunties; they will all emphasize and reinforce the idea of being thin equals being attractive or desirable. Seeing or hearing people of a bigger size be fat-shamed regularly can lead to a very negative body image and excessive weight loss strategies such as purging. It can also result in a deterioration of mental health and an increase in negative…


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