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Has Malala Become a Puppet of The West?




Many of us are familiar with Malala Yousufzai, and while she was once an inspiration to me, my perspective on her has recently shifted.


Among the three girls who were shot, Malala stood out as the sole individual airlifted on a private plane for advanced treatment in Birmingham. In contrast, Shazia Ramzan, shot twice in the arm, and Kainat Riaz, shot in the hand, persevered with their education at the same school without the opportunity for the high-level treatment Malala received.


Despite her advocacy for girls' education in Pakistan, questions arise about her commitment, considering she doesn't even reside in Pakistan anymore. If her fight is genuinely for the education rights of girls in Pakistan, why isn't she actively present in the country?


Another question that strikes is that with numerous women in Pakistan making substantial contributions and even sacrificing their lives for humanitarian causes, what sets Malala apart and leads to her receiving such recognition?


Particularly in the context of the ongoing Palestinian-Israeli conflict, Malala's decision to maintain a neutral stance, despite being a Muslim and having firsthand experience in a war-like situation, reinforces the perception that she might be a puppet influenced by Western interests. Why hasn't she spoken out or provided support for the children affected by conflicts in Palestine, Iraq, and Syria, considering the significant loss of life in wars involving ISIS and Israel's actions in Gaza?


Lastly, when considering the thousands or even millions of children who have lost their lives in recent US-led conflicts in Iraq, Afghanistan, Yemen, Syria, and Vietnam, should they not also be afforded the same level of recognition and prestige?


What do you guys think of this?

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Malala Yousafzai's commitment to advocating for girls' education in Pakistan is impressive and has inspired girls around the world. Some question why she doesn't live in Pakistan anymore and if it fits with her mission. But Pakistan's difficult social and political situation might endanger her safety and work. So, staying abroad could be a way to keep her voice strong for girls' education.Malala might maintain a neutral stance on certain issues to keep a good public image and support for her programs. She might avoid strong opinions to keep her effectiveness in speaking up for causes she cares about, especially in a society where not everyone agrees. It's complex, and her decisions might be about protecting her ability to help…

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Thank you for writing this, I feel like it is important to consider the work that Malala has done and has been doing for Pakistan. I think it is not possible for a girl to have gone through a traumatic experience to be able to work from home, but Malala still has been to Pakistan, she does visit, it is not like she has turned her face away from it. We should google up Malala fund and all that she has done for Pakistan to get a better idea. From the interview we watched of Malala with Twinkle Khana, Malala mentioned how she meets these world leaders, she is fearless and she talks about girls education with them which I…

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Hey Esha, this post is particularly interesting to me because I too had written a blog post on Malala. I agree with your stance because as a recipient of a Nobel Prize winner and moreover experiencing conflict firsthand, she should emphasize better than many. With an ongoing genocide, I don't think there is room for a neutral stance. There's a stark difference in the death toll with around 1200 in Israel and 15,000 in Palestine. Moreover, there's a stark difference in international support by nations across the globe, which enforces us to question can a situation as one sided as this one be accounted for as a war or is this plain genocide?


Initially, I too had the same question…

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I completely agree with you, Burhan! It's crucial to acknowledge Malala's efforts rather than solely focusing on the negative aspects. As I mentioned in my response to Saghaam, the discussion with Sir Hasham and the entire class has indeed shifted my perspective.

Regarding your question, I firmly believe that the conflict between Palestine and Israel is unequivocally a genocide and should not be labeled as a war. Despite an attack by Hamas, the ongoing response targeting Palestine for nearly two months cannot be justified as a proportionate or acceptable response.


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It's interesting to hear your evolving perspective on Malala Yousafzai. The disparity in the treatment the three girls received after the attack does raise some thought-provoking questions about the nature of attention and recognition in such situations.

The fact that Malala doesn't reside in Pakistan anymore does make one wonder about the depth of her commitment to the cause she champions. Advocacy from afar is undoubtedly valuable, but does it carry the same weight as being on the ground, navigating the challenges faced by those she seeks to help?

The contrast between Malala and other unsung heroes in Pakistan is striking. What distinguishes her from those who remain in the country, actively contributing to the cause without the international spotlight?

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I agree with the questions that you have raised in your comment. As I mentioned previously, I believe that being on the ground provides a deeper understanding of the depth and reality of the situation. In this context, if Malala were physically present in Pakistan, she could gain insights into the specific challenges faced in the realm of education.

While she does make commendable efforts through the Malala Fund to enhance education in Pakistan, I hold the perspective that on issues where there is a clear right and wrong side, taking a neutral stance might imply that she has become a puppet to Western powers.

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Saghaam Fatima
Saghaam Fatima
Nov 24, 2023

Your blog prompts intriguing questions that have often crossed my mind and I do agree that Malala's actions raise valid concerns, particularly regarding her silence on taking a neutral stance on the Israeli–Palestinian conflict or her silence on other conflicts. But I think that it is unfair to disregard the fact that she does not visit Pakistan or actively participate due to safety concerns. And from what we know, Malala Fund's does contribute to global development, specifically in the area of education. I would like to draw parallels between your blog and Fizas blog “GENDER AND CONFLICT – a TED talk” that basically emphasized on how women impacted by war often face exclusion from peace negotiations, further exacerbating their plig…


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After an extensive hour-long classroom discussion about Malala, I've gained valuable perspectives that challenge the notion of her being a puppet to the West. I recognise your points and I do feel like they are all valid concerns. During my research for the blog post, I noted that Malala often refrains from speaking up on issues not acknowledged by the West and, when she does, maintains a neutral stance. This led me to speculate that she might be cautious not to jeopardize support from Western powers, especially considering what they've provided her.


Also, I agree with your point that tragic losses of lives in US-led conflict don't diminish Malala's experiences, but they certainly deserve equal recognition. Every instance of suffering…

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