top of page

KIM K, BBL AND THE BODY

With the trend of low-rise jeans and 90s making a comeback since last, it begs the question, is the body of the 90s also coming back?

The current era is of the slim thick body type -popularized by Kim Kardashian and her famous BBL(Brazilian butt lift) surgery-which includes a voluptuous figure with curves.



In contrast, in the 90s, the heroin chic era was idolized by the slim non-curvaceous figure and, at the time of "Mean Girls" release, made having a big butt an insult.





This vast change in bodies and what worth they entailed has been going on before we even know it; since even print media's initial days, there have been articles for women to lose weight or to gain weight, to have an ample bosom, round hips, small hips, Etc. Anything and everything under the sun has to be changed and modified by the end of the decade to keep fashion from going stale, but women's bodies are not fashion. They are human beings who, if they fit a beauty standard, are put on a pedestal until that body type is wanted or are told to do everything in their power to change their bodies. However, women's bodies are not clothes that can be swapped every decade with a new one.

The body on-trend gives the beholder a sense of superiority like the curvaceous one. Although the notion contains some truth, the opposite is also true: The perception that women with flat chests and thin builds without being "slim thick" was further promoted by the BBL body trend. The problem lies in how various body types are compared to one another; women are meant to compete by reducing their bodies to fashionable forms.

Furthermore, even while BBLs embrace "curves," they have only ever been curves in the "right" places. Fat deposits on the cheeks are desirable, but not so much on the stomach. As standards are by definition exclusive, this one was no longer inclusive as a standard. It takes the outmoded of one physical type for another. Dieticians and plastic surgeons are the only ones who benefit when women's bodies are treated like fashion accessories and treated like trends.

In the sixteenth century, women put their health in danger by wearing corsets; in the eighteenth century, they starved themselves; and in more recent times, they had surgery to have the curves they desired. When the next thing arrives, they will act in the same manner. For the time being, until the next body type takes over, thinner women are viewed as superior. Naturally, the majority of those whose bodies are cut on a "hot or not" list are women. Men then criticize the women who give in and decide to conform to social norms about appearance, accusing them of not "loving their body"—the same body.




25 views13 comments

13 Comments


Your article really got me thinking about how people always want to look a certain way because of what's considered trendy. I've felt the pressure myself, trying to fit in with these changing beauty standards. Just yesterday, I was having a conversation with a friend about our insecurities in terms of our body where we both couldn't help but point out how we think that the other is perfect. I realised that the problem lies in the way I see myself rather than the way the world sees me. It's tough when celebrities and influencers keep promoting different body types, from really skinny to super curvy. Your call for action against treating women's bodies like fashion trends is something we…

Like

As much as I consider the Kardashians as more of a drama group with wealth, power and influence. This post highlights the inherent nature of body type are criticised and reinforced. Kim wore the Marilyn dress and I remember her stating in an interview how she had to "lose" weight to which someone criticised saying you could just have that done. I feel like looking for body validation from celebrities should be discouraged and constantly called out, Many young women are viewers and could be easily influenced by their fast weight reduction or gain without understanding the complexities of how wealth and privilege provides access to all kind of resources to reshape you and your minds. Kim K is th…

Like
Replying to

Definitely, i think everybody has role to play in this whole phenomena and even more so media, the fact that bodies can change so quickly and its presented as not a big deal is really detriemental to body images especially for young women still coming to terms with their appearance

Like

I would like to thank you for bringing this topic up. Many girls have been affected by unrealistic beauty standards, and I myself can relate to it. The celebrities make Every decade the notion of the body changed from being skinny and having flat chest to next to hourglass shape and bigger boobs. Operation theater gets filled with people who want to change their bodies and going after a few years to getting it all removed. The Kardashians have been viewed as the top influencer for this market and then called it natural too which makes one dissatisfied about the way they look. One look at Kim's reduced boobs in the Late Night show, made everyone want to get breas…

Like
Replying to

It affects both genders ofcourse but mens beauty standards change far slower and even if they dont change according to these, society often gives them a pass in favour of other attributes such as humour and wealth but a women beauty is considered to be the only asset she possesses which is why beauty standards are very toxic for women


Like

I've always found that, particularly in today's times, many of these standards aren't just perpetuated by the conversation around body types, but also the conversation around plastic surgery and insecurities. Much of the way in which people have been tackling the movement for body positivity, is by putting these cosmetic surgeries and procedures on a pedestal, proclaiming that, in the name of body positivity, one can just change that feature that causes insecurities. It has always seemed so hypocritical to me, especially when it comes down to how these standards are enforced on women, particularly young girls. The cosmetic and surgery industries are invariably promoting unhealthy views with one's own body in order to gather more customers, and it is…

Like
Replying to

certainly, the normalisation of plastic surgery and its presentation as a solution of insecurities is problematic because then when is there an end? and is that even a sustainable solution? plus consumerism comes in and these people who are benefitting off of insecurities end up becoming heroes in a sick twist of irony.

Like

Mariam
Mariam
Nov 29, 2023

As someone who has been affected by conventional beauty standards all my life, I can personally attest to the harmful effects of the ever-changing beauty standards that bombard us from all sides. From the waifish figures of supermodels in the 1990s to the surgically enhanced curves that are now considered desirable, it's a constant struggle to find a place where you feel accepted and valued for who you are, imperfections and all.

It's disheartening to see young girls feeling inadequate and unworthy because their body doesn't conform to the narrow definition of beauty that is constantly being pushed on us. What's even more frustrating is these same celebrities perpetuate insanely harmful beauty standards by promoting diet fads and weight loss…

Like
Replying to

I'm always sad to hear about any woman feeling like shes not enough because we truly are so beautiful in our own ways <3

Your question doesnt have a simple answer and like everything related with humans, i tend to see it from a case to case basis but generally i dont view women as complicit, i just feel a bit sad that these corporations who dont view us as humans just as consumers got to make a beautiful human feel like they werent enough and its not a mistake to want to be desired. That being said, we all have a responsibilties towards the younger generation, to make them feel like are enough. We can do that by feeling…

Like
Post: Blog2_Post
bottom of page