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Reforms for displaced people's education, hit or miss?

Around the end of 2021, 89.3 million people were displaced, with an estimated 36.5 million individuals below 18. Indeed the number has reached heights given the Russia and Ukraine conflict that has emerged in 2022. The hike in these numbers calls for many reforms to be made for displaced people and refugees, specifically children, and the reconsideration of priorities for improving their education.

The financial support mainly amounts to around 1.4 billion donations up until early June. For Ukraine, gripping at the importance that education has amassed has inspired private sector donations. The goals that are to be achieved for refugee education must be set in stone to move an upward hill in the improvement of the quality of education provided.


Starting with the importance of the opinions of those devastated

- Giving the refugees opportunities to provide input on the policy and programming of these education systems will ensure that their needs are fulfilled and that the program does not create unnecessary hindrances.

Assuring an early start

- Creating opportunities that induct children as soon as possible would allow continuous support amidst havoc and immediate attention

Equal division

- The access to education is most prominent within primary schools; there needs to be an expansion for education, allowing there to be meant for secondary schools and higher education


There is also a stark need for the creation of ideas for easing the transition for those displaced and preterm measures. While host countries work to provide their best, international donors need an increased interest in preparing an urgent global education plan with new solutions and partners.








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Faizan Qureshi
Faizan Qureshi
Jul 07, 2022

I really like the reforms, you have recommended at the end of the blog. Moreover I would also like you to consider the research research paper, “Inclusion and exclusion within a policy of national integration: refugee education in Kenya’s Kakuma Refugee Camp”, which illustrate how local beliefs and practices interact with global policy in both hindering the integration experiences of refugees The article’s findings and discussions can thus be taken into account to provide solutions for education of refugee children. Firstly, it’s pertinent to provide refugee children with a proper curriculum and school certification is the pathway to progressing to secondary and higher education, and onwards to employment. This curriculum should be based on both their home country and the…

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These reforms can also include one for teachers given that International donors are putting in so much aid, they can help by training teachers on how to deal with displaced children so they can better connect them on a psychological level as well. Teachers in these programs often don’t receive enough support after their recruitment given the conditions, priorities of these programs, and the high demand for teachers.

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An amazing suggestion we've stressed throughout the course the need fro training fro the teachers and given the reforms and their level of ingenuity and the support of international donors, they should definitely look into their training and well being and support, as you mentioned the latter being often ignored

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New initiatives that can be taken by International communities can be to introduce long term initiatives, a project like education on the move, children of whether fit be Ukraine, Syria, Nigeria or Afghanistan all deserve the best shot at a fulfilled quality education, with creativity there can be formidable resources that can be created to introduce solutions, ideas like online education education at times while these aren’t permanent solutions the idea would be to continue education on the move

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Your suggestion is really good, bringing in initiatives like that will help in the long run from children not being kept from education, often years are missed out by students and are left behind and are pushed back grades but creating a longterm initiative for on the move students is a great initiative that could highly benefit the students

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Wonderful blog!

Some of the solutions that you have mentioned are indeed very practical, but I disagree with one of the points. I think that we should not rely too much on international donors, instead the state hosting the refugees should improve the systems in place in order accommodate the refugees more efficiently.

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You make a valid point the governments hosting refugees have the resources and revenue to be host countries and should use initiatives like the many mentioned and improve refugee education

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I believe you have raised some excellent points. As for your point about there being opportunities for IDPs and refugees to get a secondary education, I wanted to highlight the issue of Afghan girls not having the resources to get secondary education. I believe it is an issue of crucial importance as these girls will not be able to bring themselves and their families out of the poor socioeconomic conditions they live in, unless they have access to secondary education. Not having secondary education also means that their parents will get them married right out of primary school, when they are still minors, leading to an increase in child marriages. Therefore, I do believe that the issue of provision of…

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I completely agree the provision of secondary education and tertiary education should be mandatory given that these are the facets in education that assure a good economic future for individuals and the prevention of sending girls to school is a large part of the community that isn't receiving that education making them unable to achieve the education and reserves to work jobs that require more knowledge and education

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