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Revealing Double standards of society in Sol Yanim



Sol Yanim is a Turkish drama. I started watching this drama because of Ozge Yagiz. The plot is good. Serra lives with her mother in a small, crudely built shack. Each character is complex and has many hidden secrets which are unfolding in every episodes, with a touch of love and affection. It is based on the "departures of loved ones" because of that their left side (Sol Yanim) always bleeds as their half of the body is gone. Throughout, I enjoyed this series. But there are few themes that seemed problematic to me. Serra’s mother ignores her and give all her love and care to her brother. After her brother’s suicide, Serra takes care of her mother and support the living expenses.

It shows “son preference over daughters.” This depicts the double standards of our society. Parents show all their affection to their sons expecting financial support and care in return. One of the reasons of showing neglect and restrictive attitude towards daughter is their perception that daughters tend to move out of their home, as “they are brought up to serve someone else” – typically, their husband’s family.


Serra does her job well. She gets the offer of a Limousine ride from the famous businessman as an recognition of her work. She accepts the offer in order not to miss the class. She grabs the attention of the university students as she step out from limousine. Students assume that she comes from a very rich family and hence, they try to learn as much information as possible about her. All become fascinate by her car. This shows that we ,as a society lives materialistically. We live in a society where people are judged based on what they produce or consume. People prefer money over everything. They gets fascinated by wealthy people abruptly.

https://youtu.be/7WUAvhwhmw



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14 Comments


Well done Ammara.

However I think that here could be so much room for improvement. I like this show but it had flaws like why did every side character get a plot? I don't want to know about what Selim's stepmom brother is doing. Or how they forced the relationship between Selim and Serra; Burak and Serra had more chemistry than them. I wanted those two character development. Also, why did they make every girl look stupid over Selim? First of all, he's not all that and it makes females look weak and embarrassing. And how they try to blame Selim for Hulay's actions? Like I'm sorry shawty is so in love with him that she wanted to end her…

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Thank you Sheraz for comment! Yeah, I think there's much room for improvement. And there are still few themes in this drama that I didn't highlight for a reason.

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Good work Ammara!

One of the best turkish series you have rightly mention our preferences are killing our morality and the fact that people just expect financial support from their sons don't you think that it puts a lot of pressure being a son in our society and why cant you expect financial support from your daughter while you are spending equally on her. Even in media the expectation of financial support by daughters are portrayed in very negative light in latest drama habs that women have all 3 daughters but her expectation after she gave them all they need from daughters are potrayed in a negative light.

Thank you for writing this great blog!

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Thank you for taking time to reply. You've a very insightful question and I agree. This is how tv dramas represent daughters. Even if they show girls being financially independent but they'll most of time relate with other controversial topics such as "larki financially independent hai but bohot liberal hai, aisi larki ko agar khandaan mein bahu bana kar ayein tou ye tabahi macha degi etc". And viewers like these type of dramas. Just imagine what type of influence or we can impact viewers will have on watching these sort of impractical topics. Thus, elevision and movies emphasize controversy because that draws viewers and hold their attention.

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Sabeeh - 24020369
Sabeeh - 24020369
Aug 06, 2022

Great blog, Ammara! You have rightly pointed out the problematic themes here. It's a sad reality in many homes that sons are treated better than daughters just on the basis of gender and problematic concepts like "betiyan tou paraye ghar ki hoti hain" are circulated in the society. This is a huge issue in Pakistan but I'm surprised to see a Turkish drama highlight this as well. It's unfortunate that the same stigmas are a part of the Turkish society as well.


Great work!

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I am glad that you agreed with it. I watch a lot of Turkish dramas. I don't know but I feel kinda attachment to these dramas. Most of the Turkish dramas depict this kind of issues that daughters are treated bad but sons as heroes or creatures from other planets. They also depict the "happily ever after" notion that if you marry a rich handsome man, you'll life will be like a Disney princesses. And sometimes they begin with a perilous journey that uncovers many secrets.

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Turkish dramas have become very popular over time. I think some of these themes that you have addressed are actually problematic and are also shown in other dramas. Also, due to such themes, the public always wants the guy to be rich and the girl to be poor, but I think that needs to be changed. For example, in “yasak Elma,” they have shown how money is everything. How everything starts from money and ends with money . for that, they also showed how the women also marry the same man over and over again. Although she caught him cheating on her several time but still every time she remarried him or gave up on her decision to divorce whenever…

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Thank you for taking the time to reply, Areej. What I think we as a society are conditioned to believe that "aik din koi Ameer shehzada ayega aur hamari life set hojaye gi, aur agar Ameer hona hai tou shortcut ye hai k Kisi Ameer bande ko phansao". Over the past few years, turkish dramas have seeped out of the borders of the country and gained a worldwide fanbase. So, to get ratings sometimes or because of the fact people like these type of stories, there are these kind of dramas. Ask laftan Anlamaz, Ask-i-mamnu these are the dramas that have airy-fairy sort of stories.

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Hi, Ammara! Thanks for the share! You have debunked gender stereotypes and consumerism pretty aptly. I have a pressing question for you since it has been weighing on my mind since quite sometime:

Do you think that TV dramas construct realistic representations of society? For instance, are all middle class families in Pakistan conservative (as depicted in ARY dramas)? Or, are all elite families arrogant (a stereotype exacerbated by Hum Tv)?

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Thank you, Aiman for understanding my point. What I think tv dramas do not always show the realistic representation of society. If a TV show is not interesting, it would lose viewers. If it loses viewers, it loses advertisers. If it loses advertisers, it loses revenue. If it loses revenue, it is cancelled. So they strive to make it interesting, and to do that it must be more interesting than reality. For example, if you've read Peer-e-Kamil, you'll see the representation of Ahmadis is not correct.

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