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What's wrong in 'Main Abdul Qadir Hoon'




Abdul Qadir (AQ), the title role is played by Fahad Mustafa. The story is about a teenager Abdul Qadir who is born in a privileged background but always felt lonely because his mother is a workaholic woman who always scorns him. His relationship with his father is normal but the family never felt intact because of his mother's attitude. Abdul Qadir then fell in love with a girl who later on exposes him to contraband items (drugs and alcohol). The things were new to him and he didn't prefer that kind of life but carried on just for the sake of girl. However, the girl dumps him for someone more masculine than him. Heartbroken, he decides to go abroad for his studies. After the time skip to abroad, he is shown as a completely different guy who ends up partying and boozing all the time. He also goes through an image makeover looking more like a masculine adult. Even after this life, he is shown in grief because of that girl who dumped him. Later on, he meets a black Christian girl (Nell Ibrahim) who has aids because she was a sex worker before but she has completely abandoned her past life. She starts to work as a maid for him and sometimes uses to question him about his religious views because of the lifestyle he has adopted. Nell is shown as a curious being and someone who has realized her past wrongdoings and now seeks peace and answers to divine truth. AQ because of the character of Nell, falls in love with her and marries her. Nell passes away leaving AQ crushed but she is the reason that he decides to leave his current lifestyle and turns to religion whole-heartedly. There is another time skip in which AQ returns to his home in Pakistan and in the process adopts the general appearance of a typical maulvi. His mother is shocked over his turnaround and is rightly concerned that he will be singled out and victimized.


The black-and-white portrayal of AQ is what I dislike, even if it is an interesting and difficult part for any actor to play given the trajectory he must follow. Furthermore, the serial promoted this hypocrite idea that only person who knows about Islam is a maulvi. So there is no way for someone who is drinking and having a good time to have or be connected to something spiritual? But there are people all around us who are allegedly both immoral and spiritual. While there are many individuals among us who claim to be religious but are so wicked that it defies belief. Such a crude examination of religion indicates that it is pandering to the lowest common denominator and that it is unwilling to question people's perceptions. The way that women are portrayed in "Main Abdul Qadir Hoon" is another issue. The mother who works is equivalent to a narcissistic, materialistic, neglectful person who couldn't give a damn about her family. While there may be such ladies in our society, the writer and filmmaker acted very irresponsibly by portraying women as having no goodness at all. It also blames working women for failing to strike a balance between their personal and professional lives. It is important to combat this sexist viewpoint. The protagonist's romantic involvement with an Aids sufferer is the only thing to be commended, as it sends the message that relationships with such people are conceivable.


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10 Comments


Sabeeh - 24020369
Sabeeh - 24020369
Aug 06, 2022

Good work with the blog Abdul Rehman!

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Abdul Rehman Mirza
Abdul Rehman Mirza
Aug 07, 2022
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Thank you, Sabeeh. Really appreciate your kind and encouraging remark.

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Such a good blog Abdul Rehman! Mai Abdula Qadir Hun was my favourite when I was a child, but now that I think about it, I absolutely agree with the misrepresentation of gender normative behaviour, especially Abdul Qadir's mother who, as you rightly pointed out, was shown to be unable to have a healthy home just because she was a working lady. In addition, if I remember correctly, she was shown as immodest because of her working status too, as if alluding that "kaam karnay wali auratain sahi nahi hoteen". I also did not like the fact that Abdul Qadir was shown weak when he was unalloyed, innocent, and soft. Just because of that, he wasn't considered "masculine" but again…

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Abdul Rehman Mirza
Abdul Rehman Mirza
Aug 07, 2022
Replying to

Hey! a great observation. You rightfully pointed out the stereotypes that our media is trying to show us that if we want a lady, we must be strong and tough. What's more problematic is how they define masculinity like having muscles and being tough and rude to everyone around would help you lure girls. While I do agree with your contention that AQ was portrayed as a person who submitted his will to God wholeheartedly and that he was following even the minute details of religion. But the message it gives to the audience and youngsters is that if they want to get religious, they must first change their looks and have a complete change-over which is quite problematic.

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Hello Abdul Rehman!

Your blog has just brought to remember a drama I may have watched a year ago that is like this because of the male protagonist, "Ranjha Ranjha Kardi." Due to the variety of characters and themes, I really liked this drama, most significantly, because of this bizarre behavior and acting, male characters are in some ways similar.

So, yeah, I do believe that Pakistani dramas shouldn't have to depict male characters in this way and then demonstrate that Islam is the only path to success. I do not appreciate the notion that a Maulvi is the only individual who practices Islam. And these kinds of serials propagate the false notion that you must appear pious in order…


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Abdul Rehman Mirza
Abdul Rehman Mirza
Aug 07, 2022
Replying to

Hey Bushra! I really appreciate your insightful feedback and thank you for your suggestion. I will surely have a look at it. I do agree on the points that you are trying to make that this is a reality in many parts of our society but the impact it is creating on the audience and youngsters is what's alarming. So the show-makers really need to consider the fact that media can impact the way a person perceives the society and its traditions.

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This blog instantly grappled my attention! I particularly appreciate the dual misrepresentation of women and religion which you have drawn upon. I believe that drama directors and filmmakers need to be more open to the idea that womanhood and religiosity can come in different shapes. Just because a representation challenges our worldview doesnt render it less merited. Pakistani dramas are too ruthless in their judgement and barely make effort to show character interiority. The 'good vs bad' binary which is created isolates a lot of the audience who might just find themselves viewing the world through an unbiased lens, you know?

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Abdul Rehman Mirza
Abdul Rehman Mirza
Aug 07, 2022
Replying to

An insightful response indeed. I agree with your contention. I believe that, like sir emphasized in the class, the only way to abolish gender discriminatory contradictions and create a true understanding of women's status in developing nations like Pakistan is to invest in public education. Unlikely Pakistan continued to make appallingly insufficient investments in girls' education, which can serve as the cornerstone of systemic transformation in a society to lessen gender discrimination. Women who have received an education are the most likely to be aware of gender bias and to be financially independent, which will help to alleviate poverty, which is the main driver of gender discrimination in Pakistan and even worsens it throughout the developing globe.

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I find your blog very insightful. Uve made some arguments that would be seen as very controvertial yet I agree with them. Spirituality does not matter on the sins one indulges in. However there is a slight disagreement I would want to present. The media in question is a TV drama series that too Pakistani notourious for being well over the top dramatic. So writers resort to change in getups to signify change in personalities. That can be problematic as it can result in stereotypes but should we not acknowledge it as a drama only. Its not going to be hyper realistic ofcourse. I think its a very vivid description of how much society influence can change someone and how…

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Abdul Rehman Mirza
Abdul Rehman Mirza
Aug 07, 2022
Replying to

Hey! I appreciate your insightful response. I do get your point but I want to emphasize the fact that society has willingly associated different attires to different professions. Why an imam e masjid cannot wear other attire other than shalwar qameez and pagh even on formal occasions? It's not that Abdul Qadir was not accepted by society in all of his phases, but the phases and different roles he played were associated with specific attire and personality which is problematic.

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